optimizing your images for Pinterest Pinterest is hailed as the next big thing after Facebook and if this is the case then you should do the best you can to be one of the pioneering online businesses to make it big on Pinterest. With this social networking site, it is important to understand that you can sink or swim with your photos. No matter how wonderfully worded your descriptions are, they won’t do any good if your photos are not worth repinning or if they do not qualify for a single like. In order to make sure that your images are optimized for sharing and for search engine marketing, then you may want to consider the following tips. Pin as many original photos as you can. With photos that you have taken yourself, you get to choose where to link it. Obviously, it’s best to link it to your blog or website, as this will increase your chances of promoting your goods or services. Original photos are also better than repins because they have an increased likelihood of going viral as well. Don’t forget keywords. Keywords matter and they should be used as prominently as possible but without being too obvious about your focus on search engine marketing. Here are several ideal places for you to use your keywords in. • Replace generic file names with keyword-oriented names, e.g. IMG0014 to lemon_meringue.jpg • Include keywords in the first and last sentences of your pin description • Include at least one keyword in comments you post on related pins • Include a parent keyword in the title or name of your pinboard Pay attention to the size of your photos. More often than not, Internet users don’t really care about images that take too long to load – especially when they are accessing Pinterest using a mobile device. They don’t care much either for photos, which require them to scroll down, down, down to see it in its full size. Remember: they need to scroll back up just to repin or like your photo, and not all of them will have the time or interest to do so. Images are not always photos. At the end of the day, Pinterest is all about images – and these refer to not only the photos or pictures that you have taken with a camera. It can also be an artwork you’ve created with basic Microsoft Paint or Adobe Photoshop. It can be a full-fledged poster, a visual strategy – anything that can be saved as an image can still be pinned to Pinterest. In fact, if you are targeting markets that aren’t exactly enamored by reading (such as teenagers currently busy with prom preparations) then you would have better chances of capturing their attention with images that serve as summarized versions of your articles. But of course, with such images you should also provide a link to the actual full-length text. If they like your image enough, they’ll probably be willing to give its accompanying article or blog post a fair shot. Always start and end your pin descriptions with one-liners. Naturally, those one-liners must include your targeted keywords. Pinterest only gives you 500 characters to describe your pin and Pinterest users who repin your photos would like to use some of them. In order to make sure that they don’t completely erase everything you’ve written, leave them with one-liners they’ll find irresistible to share with others.